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2 days ago

Gatineau Gliding Club - GGC

Yay Sarah! ...

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WWGC update: There are usually start-gate games as pilots wait after the start-gate opens to let others leave, and mark thermals. It is fairly easy for a world-class pilot to at least catch them, and a few points a day is the difference between a podium and 'I was there'. If you wait too long, and the day doesn't develop as forecast, some people land out. On Jan 11 (Oz time and date), the forecast was that the day would end early, but that's been the case on a few of the days, and conditions held and improved later, so those who left according to the forecast dropped in the rankings. Not in this case; 100% of the pilots landed out (or motored home with the small turbo reciprocating engines, jets, or front electric sustainer engines - which are detected by the flight recorder as a 'land-out' at that position). They are in the process of taking trailers out to retrieve them from fields. I expect the rankings will shift somewhat. I see from the tracker that some elected to land a bit early in order to land at an airport/agricultural strip. Smart move - if your glider is damaged, you cannot fly the rest of the contest. You can also call for an airtow retrieve, which gets you home more quickly, more time to recover for the next day. They've flown eight days (seven official and the one cancelled for safety due to smoke) in over 40C/100F heat, with a few practice days before, and they will be exhausted, and somewhat down due to the landouts. The true champions (and those with the best support structure) will recharge for the final push. Last flying day is Friday the 17th, with the awards on the 18th of January. Scores at:
www.soaringspot.com/en/10th-fai-womens-world-gliding-championship-lake-keepit-2020/results
and a report from Gliding Australia:
glidingaustralia.org/member-services/sport/294-mass-landout-day-at-wwgc-lake-keepit?fbclid=IwAR0Y...
...

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While Ottawa ponders the approach of a wild winter weekend, at the other side of the planet, the 10th FAI Women's World Gliding Championship is about half-way done at Lake Keepit, Australia. They have had minor effect from the fires - one task was cancelled about 3 hours in when visibility was unsafe - and they've had unrelenting heat (40C average, highs of 42C). There are 3 classes - 18m wingspan (with flaps), Standard Class (15m, no flaps), and Club (various gliders, handicapped for fairness). Canada doesn't have a team, but we do have a connection; currently leading in Standard Class is Team USA's Sarah Arnold, who owns a commercial gliding operation in Chilhowee, TN, was born in the U.S. but was raised on a farm in Lumby, B.C. (near Vernon). She has previous won Bronze (Issoudin, France, 2013) and Silver (Zbraslavice, Czech Republic, 2015) medals at WWGCs. She is the current U.S. 20m multiplace champion (with Karl Striedieck). She has led the class since convincingly winning Day 1. Lake Keepit is famous for final glides over the Lake to a runway right at the edge, where you really don't want to be short a little. The lake is normally 16 square miles (41 km squared) but is at 0.4% of capacity, according to John Good's, U.S. Team Captain, blog. Courtesy of the 10th FAI Women's World Championship, here's a picture of the starting grid and lake, which I found on Ritz's famous soaring blog (I met her at the 2012 WGC in Uvalde, TX, when I blogged for Canada). You can bet there is a world of dust when they launch the grid! Their high Thursday is a cool 39C, and ours... -12C (but according to the Fuel Shack, the days are getting longer, and our soaring season is just around the corner). ...

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2 weeks ago

Gatineau Gliding Club - GGC

Gatineau Gliding Club - GGC's cover photo ...

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A late season flying day in December. A bit slippy for the first bit, but the wind was directly down the runway and the aerodynamic controls were plenty to keep straight until the glider had flying speed. ...

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